• Reechal Mevada

A fitbit in your skull


In the summer of 2016, WhatsApp turned on end-to-end encryption by default for all of their billions of users becoming the world's largest encrypted messenger.


This decision by the Facebook-owned company meant that nobody at the company can access any content of the messages sent.


Well, I have been using whatsapp since 2012, ignoring all the ‘terms and agreement’ just like I use the AR effect for my Instagram story knowing that the creator has access to my photos.


I was reading ‘The best privacy friendly alternatives to google maps’ on Wired the other day and…

*enter Neuralink* straight out of a Blackmirror episode


Our world is turning digital. Who we are is a matter of data.


The digital world is confusing, and everyone exists in the rooms that are supposed to make us happy, on the servers of Google, Facebook and Amazon. What happens when we try to escape this medium? We exist as digital reflections of ourselves which may look like us but are different. And long ago we lost control over them.


Data dance


“Not the ghost in the machine, but the body in the medium is the central dilemma of modern communications…” – John Durham Peters

In a possible near future, where quantifying of the self is taken to its logical extreme, every person has their own “supermetric” data of their personal life.

“Updated in real-time, the supermetric is a dynamic version of the self outside the self, a digibody. People have come to think of it as a metonym for one’s “total” state of being. Your metric is you. This quantified self exists independently from the physical self and yet everything from friends, to employees, to spouses, to politicians are chosen based on it. Increasingly, however, there is a desire to physically experience the data world; to reintroduce in the ambiguities and ontological weirdness of everyday meatspace.” – director Sara Krugman and Zubin Pastakia.


Big Data


Can we raise a child purely through a piece of technology?

Big Data presents a series of commercials in which a typical family is terrorized by their revolutionary new A.I. product. Well, I’m still a huge fan of my Alexa.

This film also reminds me of a short story ‘Dacey's Patent Automatic Nanny’ by Ted Chiang (somehow, I always end up going back to ‘Exhalation’). The Automatic Nanny, devised by a proponent of “rational child-rearing,” fails to be an ideal parent.


We are data


Is our identity still in our hands?

We are all dancing to the same beat longing for the next advancement to come. We leave it to the companies to design our digital world, we are fine being told. But what happens if we escape from the mainstream internet and meet our digital self? Will we actually do what needs to be done?



This article was originally written for www.labocine.com/spotlights (an initiative by Imagine Science Films, NYC) and the short films featured on this post can be watched on Labocine.

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Will the real AI please stand up?